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CLC number: TP391

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Received: 2005-08-05

Revision Accepted: 2005-09-10

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Journal of Zhejiang University SCIENCE A 2005 Vol.6 No.11 P.1348-1353

http://doi.org/10.1631/jzus.2005.A1348


Om: One tool for many (Indian) languages


Author(s):  GANAPATHIRAJU Madhavi, BALAKRISHNAN Mini, BALAKRISHNAN N., REDDY Raj

Affiliation(s):  Language Technologies Institute, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA; more

Corresponding email(s):   madhavi@cs.cmu.edu, balki@serc.iisc.ernet.in, rr@cmu.edu

Key Words:  Om transliteration, Indian language technologies, Text editor


GANAPATHIRAJU Madhavi, BALAKRISHNAN Mini, BALAKRISHNAN N., REDDY Raj. Om: One tool for many (Indian) languages[J]. Journal of Zhejiang University Science A, 2005, 6(11): 1348-1353.

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Abstract: 
Many different languages are spoken in India, each language being the mother tongue of tens of millions of people. While the languages and scripts are distinct from each other, the grammar and the alphabet are similar to a large extent. One common feature is that all the Indian languages are phonetic in nature. In this paper we describe the development of a transliteration scheme Om which exploits this phonetic nature of the alphabet. Om uses ASCII characters to represent Indian language alphabets, and thus can be read directly in English, by a large number of users who cannot read script in other Indian languages than their mother tongue. It is also useful in computer applications where local language tools such as email and chat are not yet available. Another significant contribution presented in this paper is the development of a text editor for Indian languages that integrates the Om input for many Indian languages into a word processor such as Microsoft WinWord®. The text editor is also developed on Java® platform that can run on Unix machines as well. We propose this transliteration scheme as a possible standard for Indian language transliteration and keyboard entry.

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Reference

[1] Balakrishnan, N., Reddy, R., Ganapathiraju, M., 2005. Digital Library of India: A testbed for Indian Language Research. IEEE Technical Committee on Digital Libraries Bulletin: Special Issue on Asian Digital Library Research (In Press).

[2] Jayaraman, A., Sangani, S., Ganapathiraju, M., 2004. OmSE: Tamil Search Engine. Proc. Tamil Internet Conference, Singapore.

[3] Bose, D.K., 2001. Rural India–Wired Up? View Point Online Magazine, 4. http://www.ogilvy.com/viewpoint/view.ko.php?id=16216&iMagaId=6.

[4] Excerpts from the 1906 edition of Linguistic Survey of India (Telugu). http://www.engr.mun.ca/~adluri/telugu/language/usage/grierson/introduction.html.

[5] Krishnan, G., 2002, Challengers in Rural Marketing, Strategic Marketing Forum. http://www.etstrategicmarketing.com/smJune-July2/forum.htm.

[6] Smith, M., 2000. India’s Chance to Lead the World. For a Change Magazine. http://www.forachange.co.uk/index.php?stoid=168.

[7] Well, D.H., 2001, Milestones: A Road Map to the Indian Middle Class APF Reporter, 20(1). http://www.Davidhwells.com/PhotoEssays/globalindia/middleclas/default.html.

[8] SiliconIndia, 2005. $100 Computer Coming from India. http://www.siliconindia.com/shownewsdata.asp?newsno=28077&newscat=Technology.

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